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Surgery

Spine surgeon South Carolina, Minimally invasive spine surgery, Artificial disc replacement Spine surgeon, second opinion, Herniated disc, Laser spine surgery, neurosurgery south Carolina, Second opinion for spine surgery, Home remedies for pain, Spine center of excellence South Carolina, orthopedic surgeon south carolinaIf nonsurgical treatment options have failed, or if there are

emergency symptoms, spine surgery may be necessary.The spine surgeons at South Carolina Spine Center each perform a high volume of spine surgery each year—typically well over 200 cases annually. They are also fellowship-trained (the highest level of training possible) and board-certified. They concentrate their practice exclusively on spine surgery. Their expertise includes minimally invasive spine surgery, all common surgical problems in the neck and low back, scoliosis surgery, as well as new innovations including total disc replacement. In addition, the surgeons at South Carolina Spine Center are already referred some of the most complex spine cases across the region and have extensive experience with cervical myelopathy, scoliosis and deformity surgery as well as revision surgery. This experience translates into improved patient care of all spinal problems.

Leaders in spine surgery technology

lumbar surgical navigation system south carolina, greenwood, south carolina spine center
Image ©Brainlab, Inc., Used with Permission

Surgeons at Self Regional Healthcare’s South Carolina Spine Center in Greenwood, SC are now treating patients with a variety of spinal conditions in its new advanced surgical operating room (OR) featuring Brainsuite® iCT from Brainlab.

Using the Brainsuite® iCT technology, complex revision procedures can now provide pain relief to patients who have undergone spine surgery elsewhere and had less than optimal results.

Image above shows the Brainsuite navigation screen when a pedicle screw is being placed in the spine.

Self Regional continues its commitment to advanced spinal care by becoming the first institution in the Southeast to use this highly advanced OR technology.

Integrating navigation with diagnostic quality intra-operative images offers tremendous benefit to the patient. The surgeons can perform with a higher level of accuracy in terms of instrument placement, supported by the ability to check that a surgical outcome has been achieved prior to concluding the procedure. This advanced technology has taken the OR to the next level.

Brainsuite iCT is a digitally integrated OR that combines image-guided surgery (IGS), with a multi-slice intra-operative computed tomography scanner (iCT) and comprehensive OR data management. The CT travels on rails over the OR table, providing high-quality intra-operative scanning without waking the patient from anesthesia.

cervical surgical navigation system south carolina, greenwood, south carolina spine center
Image ©Brainlab, Inc., Used with Permission

It drives access to real-time imaging and enriched patient data that surgeons can use to make timely and informed decisions, as well as obtain pre-closure verification of results. Brainsuite iCT can be used for neuro, spine, ENT, cranio-maxillo-facial, trauma and orthopedic surgeries.

Image to the left shows the Brainsuite navigation screen of the cervical spine.

With the digital data management system Brainsuite® Net, patient data from the hospital’s Picture Archiving and Communications System (PACS) is accessible in the OR. Automatic Image Registration from Brainlab supports instant patient registration of intra-operative images without the need for fiducial markers or landmark recognition for seamless and time-saving navigation for surgeons. The VectorVision® sky navigation platform displays patient data collected during surgery and is equipped with two infrared cameras that verify the patient’s position in the OR.

This surgical navigation system integrates 3-D images from a CT scanner in the operating room with realtime guidance of instrumentation that functions much like a GPS system, but is incredibly more accurate. South Carolina Spine Center neurosurgeons can see images of the spine, discs and nerves during surgery and confirm placement within 1 millimeter. It provides the highest level of precision and accuracy available anywhere in the world, but it’s located right here in South Carolina.

The following is a list of common surgical problems and issues.

Cervical Spine / Neck

Spine surgeon South Carolina, Minimally invasive spine surgery, Artificial disc replacement Spine surgeon, second opinion, Herniated disc, Laser spine surgery, neurosurgery south Carolina, Second opinion for spine surgery, Home remedies for pain, Spine center of excellence South Carolina, orthopedic surgeon south carolinaDiscectomy is the removal of the herniated portion of a disc to relieve the pressure on nearby nerves as they exit the spinal canal. Contrary to myths, the disc does not slip out of position like a watermelon seed. Instead, the disc is like a jelly donut, acting as the functional shock absorber between two bony vertebrae. An injury, damage from a lifting incident or a twist may cause the jelly center to break through the wall of the disc. When a disc herniates, the jelly center can press on nearby nerves. In the neck, this causes arm, shoulder, scapula and, in extreme cases, spinal cord compression.

Posterior Cervical Foraminotomy / Discectomy

For some herniated discs or bone spurs in the neck affecting only the nerve roots, a posterior discectomy and foraminotomy can be performed. This avoids spinal fusion, and with a microscope or a minimally invasive technique, can minimize recovery time and speed a patient back to work or activities.

Anterior Cervical Discectomy

Cervical is the medical term for "neck." Just as in a lumbar discectomy, the surgeon will remove a piece of damaged disc tissue in the neck area to relieve pressure on the spinal cord or nerve roots. In some cases, by removing a piece of the shock-absorbing disc that separates the two vertebrae, the structures may become less stable. Consequently, when the disc is removed, a surgeon may recommend "fusing" the vertebrae to prevent instability. A cervical discectomy is best left to surgeons who specialize in spine.

Corpectomy

Spine surgeon South Carolina, Minimally invasive spine surgery, Artificial disc replacement Spine surgeon, second opinion, Herniated disc, Laser spine surgery, neurosurgery south Carolina, Second opinion for spine surgery, Home remedies for pain, Spine center of excellence South Carolina, orthopedic surgeon south carolinaA corpectomy is often performed for patients suffering from multiple levels of cervical stenosis with cord compression. The goal of a corpectomy is complete decompression of the spinal canal when stenosis encompasses more than just disc space and has moved into vertebral bodies.

Bone spurs forming toward the back of a vertebral body or the ligament behind vertebral bodies can cause the cervical spinal canal to narrow. Therefore, it may be necessary to remove one or more degenerating vertebrae and the discs above and below in order to decompress the spinal cord and nerve roots.

A corpectomy involves a vertical incision in the neck. The middle portion of the vertebra and its adjacent discs are removed to achieve decompression of the cervical spinal cord and nerve roots. A fusion accompanies a corpectomy surgery, using bone harvested from the patient's hip or from a bone bank. This bone graft is used to reconstruct the spine and provide stability.

Anterior Cervical Fusion

A fusion accompanies a anterior cervical discectomy or corpectomy. During fusion surgery, a disc Is removed, and the surgeon inserts a small wedge of bone between two vertebrae to restore disc space. Over time, the two vertebrae "fuse" together into a single solid structure. While this procedure limits movement and flexibility, it also helps relieve neck pain.

Bone graft for the purpose of spinal fusion may be harvested from the patient's hip (autograft bone), from a cadaver bone (allograft bone), or from synthetic bone graft substitutes, which are currently being developed more extensively. Your surgeon will help you decide what is best for you.

LaminoplastySpine surgeon South Carolina, Minimally invasive spine surgery, Artificial disc replacement Spine surgeon, second opinion, Herniated disc, Laser spine surgery, neurosurgery south Carolina, Second opinion for spine surgery, Home remedies for pain, Spine center of excellence South Carolina, orthopedic surgeon south carolina

A laminoplasty, similar to a laminectomy, is often performed on patients suffering from spinal stenosis in the neck (narrowing of the cervical spinal canal). It is also referred to as an "open-door laminoplasty." A laminoplasty creates more space for the spinal cord and roots. The actual procedure involves cutting a “hinge” into one side of the lamina and swinging it open like a door. It relieves pressure on the spinal cord by increasing the diameter of the spinal canal and room for the spinal cord. The surgery approach is through the back of the neck. This procedure creates excellent spinal canal decompression without the instability that may be created by multiple level cervical laminectomies.
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Lumbar surgery/low back

Microdiscectomy / Minimally invasive discectomy

Discectomy is the removal of the herniated portion of a disc to relieve the pressure on nearby nerves as they exit the spinal canal. Contrary to myths, the disc does not slip out of position like a watermelon seed. Instead, the disc is like a jelly donut, acting as the functional shock absorber between two bony vertebrae. An injury, damage from a lifting incident, or a twist may cause the jelly center to break through the wall of the disc. When a disc herniates, the jelly center can press on nearby nerves. This causes back or leg pain when the hernation is in the low back, and arm pain if the disc is in the neck area (see "cervical spine/neck").

Spine surgeon South Carolina, Minimally invasive spine surgery, Artificial disc replacement Spine surgeon, second opinion, Herniated disc, Laser spine surgery, neurosurgery south Carolina, Second opinion for spine surgery, Home remedies for pain, Spine center of excellence South Carolina, orthopedic surgeon south carolinaIn a lumbar discectomy, the surgeon typically only removes the portion of the disc that is causing a problem, not the entire disc. If you have a herniated disc, keep in mind that a disc has a purpose. When you remove a disc, it may cause instability in the joint, and a surgeon may recommend a fusion to re-stabilize the area.

The surgeon can remove the damaged piece of disc through a traditional incision in the back. However, at South Carolina Spine Center, the surgeons typically use a microscope to minimize incision size, tissue trauma and recovery time. In addition, in some cases, minimally invasive discectomy can provide an even less invasive approach.

Depending on the nature of your disc problem, your surgeon will recommend the most appropriate type of surgery for you.

Posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF)

Spine surgeon South Carolina, Minimally invasive spine surgery, Artificial disc replacement Spine surgeon, second opinion, Herniated disc, Laser spine surgery, neurosurgery south Carolina, Second opinion for spine surgery, Home remedies for pain, Spine center of excellence South Carolina, orthopedic surgeon south carolinaThis spinal fusion surgery is very similar to the anterior lumbar interbody fusion, except that the surgeon approaches the spine through the low back. This method is used when there is a greater amount of instability in the patient's spine. An advantage to this surgery is that it can also provide anterior fusion of the disc space without having a second incision.

Lumbar laminectomy

A laminectomy involves the removal of part or all of the bone covering the spinal canal. The purpose of this procedure can be to free nerve roots, remove a tumor, bone spur or to perform certain types of fusion procedures. Removing the lamina (laminectomy) is much like removing the cover on a fuse box to access the wiring. By removing the lamina, the surgeon gains access to the disc area and frees more space for the nerves inside.

A laminectomy in the lumbar spine is often used to treat recurrent disc herniations or where scar tissue is involved. Laminectomy may also be used in cases of spinal stenosis in which the entire canal is narrowed like a ring on a swollen finger, squeezing all of the nerve roots at that level of the spinal canal.
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Spine surgeon South Carolina, Minimally invasive spine surgery, Artificial disc replacement Spine surgeon, second opinion, Herniated disc, Laser spine surgery, neurosurgery south Carolina, Second opinion for spine surgery, Home remedies for pain, Spine center of excellence South Carolina, orthopedic surgeon south carolinaScoliosis & spinal deformity surgery

Through the placement of hooks, rods and screws, a spinal curve can be corrected and stabilized. A fusion often follows scoliosis surgery, in order to maintain the correction permanently.

Scoliosis is not the result of an injury and usually appears without cause. It can be inherited, and it usually affects more women than men. In the case of most spinal curves, the spine is not only bent but also twisted like a bent corkscrew. Some cases of scoliosis are not serious. Over time, if a curve worsens, surgery may be required to correct the curve and prevent pain and worsening deformity. In extreme cases, if the curve is not corrected, the spinal deformity can place pressure on internal organs, which can shorten a person's life expectancy.

During scoliosis surgery, the surgeon may use special instruments that attach onto various vertebra segments. These surgical rods are the adjusted to "de-rotate" the twisted and bent corkscrew spine. Decades ago, Harrington Rods (the “first-generation” of instrumentation) were used to surgically straighten the spine. However, this technique did not untwist or correct the spine. Today, there are “fourth-generation” techniques to improve corrections, minimize levels fused and minimize the need for post-operative bracing.
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Spinal fusion

Unusual movement at a vertebral segment will probably result in pain, especially if the person already has or displays symptoms of degenerative disc disease, fractures, scoliosis or a weak spine. This movement may require a discectomy, and subsequently, a lumbar interbody fusion. Anterior and posterior fusion techniques can be performed in the neck and the low back.

Spine surgeon South Carolina, Minimally invasive spine surgery, Artificial disc replacement Spine surgeon, second opinion, Herniated disc, Laser spine surgery, neurosurgery south Carolina, Second opinion for spine surgery, Home remedies for pain, Spine center of excellence South Carolina, orthopedic surgeon south carolinaNot all patients who have spinal problems need spine surgery. They can be managed with microscopic decompression or minimally invasive techniques. Spinal fusion is reserved for patients who have spinal instability, spinal deformity or painful degenerative pain. Obviously, this is only after a patient has failed all conservative measures.

In fusion surgery, the goal is to cause bone graft to grow between two vertebrae and stop the motion at a particular segment by adding bone graft to it. This results in one long bone rather than two separate vertebrae. Anterior and posterior lumbar fusions may be done separately or can be used together for the most severe problems of the cervical (neck), thoracic (chest level) and lumbar spine (low back). Your spinal surgeon will help you decide which technique is right for you.
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Image copyright © Paradigm Spine.

Coflex

For patients with stenosis (narrowing of the spinal canal that can come with age), Dr. McLoughlin performs a minimally invasive procedure using the FDA-approved Coflex® Interlaminar Stabilization device to decompress the spinal canal. The Coflex® device keeps the spine stable after a decompression but also maintains motion of the spine unlike a traditional spinal fusion. This can be a minimally invasive alternative to spinal fusion surgery for selected patients with spinal stenosis.

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Image copyright © Wenzel Spine Inc.

Varilift

Early in 2016, Dr. Greg McLoughlin, a spine surgeon at the South Carolina Spine Center, performed a minimally invasive spinal fusion operation with the new VariLift-L® Expandable Interbody Fusion Device. It was the first surgery of its kind in the state of South Carolina.

The Vari-Lift® is the only stand-alone solution for spine stabilization that eliminates the need for rods and screws to treat multiple spine disorders like disc herniation, degenerative disc disease, adjacent level disease and spondylolisthesis. The tool offers a minimally invasive approach to a fusion surgery.

In a traditional spinal fusion, a four-inch incision is made to access the vertebrae, followed by the insertion of bone grafts or other materials to fuse the bones. Other instrumentation is put in place to keep the spine stable while the fusion heals.

By contrast, using a smaller incision, the small VariLift-L® device is installed between the vertebrae, resulting in faster recovery time and less pain during recovery.

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Image copyright © Medtronic.

Artificial disc

At South Carolina Spine Center, Dr. Michael Kilburn uses the Bryan® cervical disc for certain patients with herniated discs in the neck who would otherwise need a spinal fusion. With traditional spinal fusion, two vertebrae are “fused” together with a bone graft. While this common surgery retains the disc height after a damaged disc is removed, the fusion locks the two vertebrae together which can in turn put increased stress on the disc levels above and below as the neck rotates. That can cause additional disc herniations above and below the fusion site. This is called "adjacent segment disease."

The benefit of an artificial disc is that it retains the normal motion of the disc which reduces the risk of adjacent segment disease.

For more information about artificial disc technology, click here.

 

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